Ultra-luxury cruises with private butler service.

Asia

Colombo to Singapore - Voyage Number : 7806
DEPARTURE
May 03 2022
DURATION
16 DAYS
SHIP
Silver Explorer

Itinerary & Excursions

Go beyond your boundaries and explore the world as never before.

Sri Lanka's capital and largest city, Colombo offers fine restaurants, a buzzing nightlife scene, and good museums, parks, and beautiful Buddhist temples that are all worth visiting. The beach resort of Mt. Lavinia is only a short taxi ride from the downtown area and offers a golden, sandy beach and sunset views to die for. As an exciting blur of colors and cultures, Colombo presents a neatly packaged microcosm of this island nation.

Galle is an ancient Muslim port where different political influences from Europe have merged. In fact, the Galle Fort was occupied by the Portuguese, Dutch and British until the late 19th century. Declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1988, it is surrounded by the sea on three sides. The surviving Dutch-colonial architecture and narrow streets exude the historic atmosphere of this living fort. The 18th century Dutch church has a splendid wooden memorial to one of the commanders of Galle, while the Arab quarter has a distinctly Moorish touch.

Far to the south of Sri Lanka is the city of Hambantota with a colorful and storied traditional Ruhuna past and great promise for the future. This gateway to Sri Lanka is rich in resources and since being upset by the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, has put great emphasis on rebuilding and moving progressively into a central role in the development of the southern region of Sri Lanka. Traditionally an agricultural area, the region is also known for having some of the country’s most skilled jewelers and crafts people. The bazaar or ‘pola’ is a popular market place where locals sell produce, goods, and fish.

Far to the south of Sri Lanka is the city of Hambantota with a colorful and storied traditional Ruhuna past and great promise for the future. This gateway to Sri Lanka is rich in resources and since being upset by the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, has put great emphasis on rebuilding and moving progressively into a central role in the development of the southern region of Sri Lanka. Traditionally an agricultural area, the region is also known for having some of the country’s most skilled jewelers and crafts people. The bazaar or ‘pola’ is a popular market place where locals sell produce, goods, and fish.

Trincomalee has one of the largest natural harbors in the world. Because of this several European nations fought over Trincomalee, which was already one of the most visited places of Hindu worship. Close to Trincomalee are two UNESCO World Heritage Sites. One is the ancient city of Polonnaruwa, the former capital of the Kingdom of Polonnaruwa dating back to the 12th century with its impressive ruins and statues. The second site is Sirigiya; the city of the Rock Fortress. Sirigiya is Asia’s best-preserved city center dating back to the first millennium. A massive wall defends part of the lower city and various features have been overgrown by the forest or await excavation. At the site’s summit is the fortified palace with its ruined buildings, cisterns and rock sculptures.

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
The Andamans lie on the ancient trade routes between India and the Far East. They were known to mariners from as early as the 7th century. Among the first western visitors in the 13th century was Marco Polo, who wrote of the inhabitants as being “hostile people who would kill and eat any outsider that ventured onto the islands". The islands were first settled by the British in the late 18th century when Captain Archibald Blair, on behalf of the British East India Company, founded a naval station on Chatham Island, now known as Port Blair. In 1858 a penal colony was established in Port Blair, used mainly to hold Indian freedom fighters. The clearing of jungle areas and reclaiming of swamps by these first convicts gradually helped to establish a settlement. The growing population consisted mostly of convicts who, after they served their time, decided to stay and settle in the Andamans. During World War II, the islands were occupied by the Japanese, who incarcerated many Indians on the suspicion of being British spies. As a result the local Indians took up guerrilla activities against the Japanese. When India gained independence from Britain in 1947, the islands became part of the Indian Union.

Originally chosen by the British as the capital of the Andaman Islands, today Ross Island is characterized by a series of old buildings, left behind from a gilded age of occupancy between 1858 and 1941. Among the relics are a church, bakery, three clubs, printing press, government offices, Chief Commissioner’s house, tennis courts, an ice-making plant and a cemetery – all now in ruins. Creeping vines, fig and banyan tree roots overgrow and encase many of the old buildings giving the place a mysterious, haunting and timeless beauty.

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

A popular port of entry into Myanmar, Kawthaung was formerly known as Victoria Point. Interestingly enough it has a strong Muslim and Indian influence, in addition to a Buddhist monastery atop the hill to the north of town. The monastery has impressive carved guardian dragons and offers nice views of Kawthaung. The city is diverse claiming people of Bamar, Thai, Shan, Karen, and Mon descent. The most commonly spoken languages are Burmese and Thai, and the economy revolves around rubber, betel nut, cashew nut, coconut and oil palm. Kawthaung has a large port, but the fishing industry is restricted by the government and tourism is beginning to constitute a larger segment of the local economy. The nearby Mergui Archipelago plays a significant role in attracting visitors to the region thanks to the islands’ pristine forests, coral reefs, and wildlife.

Kyunn Tann Shey (Lampi Island) is a large and mountainous island of the Mergui Islands located in the Lampi Group. Lampi is officially uninhabited but does host fishing nomads who stop to camp on the island’s shores. It is rich in biodiversity, mangroves and coral reefs, and is big enough to hold wild animals – for a while it was even rumored to shelter a small herd of elephants. With rainforest and a fringing coral reef, Lampi’s outstanding beauty is enhanced by monkeys and hornbills in the forests, and sea eagles soaring in the blue skies overhead. Lampi was established in 1995 as Myanmar’s first marine national park. Ashore you can witness some of the area’s exotic flora and fauna. The surrounding islands offer beaches regardless of tides. More than 50 white sand beaches and fringing reefs wait to be used for snorkeling, bird-watching and relaxing.

Frost Island is in the ‘Mid-Group’ of the Mergui Archipelago, a chain of roughly 800 islands that lies to the west of southern Myanmar in the Andaman Sea. Most of the archipelago is still largely undiscovered by tourism and many islands are as yet undeveloped. Tiny Frost Island in particular is known for large fig trees growing right on the beach and hundreds of hermit crab residents on its powdery white-sand beaches. The Salone people (known as Moken in Thailand and Malaysia and as Sea Gypsies in English) are the only human inhabitants of this area. A chance to meet them and see their unique boat designs is always a possibility. Frost Island is also rich in options for diving and snorkeling amongst schools of brightly colored tropical fish thanks to the surrounding coral reefs, clear waters, and a long sandy beach on the northern shore.

Kyunn Tann Shey (Lampi Island) is a large and mountainous island of the Mergui Islands located in the Lampi Group. Lampi is officially uninhabited but does host fishing nomads who stop to camp on the island’s shores. It is rich in biodiversity, mangroves and coral reefs, and is big enough to hold wild animals – for a while it was even rumored to shelter a small herd of elephants. With rainforest and a fringing coral reef, Lampi’s outstanding beauty is enhanced by monkeys and hornbills in the forests, and sea eagles soaring in the blue skies overhead. Lampi was established in 1995 as Myanmar’s first marine national park. Ashore you can witness some of the area’s exotic flora and fauna. The surrounding islands offer beaches regardless of tides. More than 50 white sand beaches and fringing reefs wait to be used for snorkeling, bird-watching and relaxing.

Lush and teeming with some of the best seafood in the world, Bo Cho Island is located south of Lampi Island in the Mergui Archipelago. The island’s stunning natural beauty, with white sand beaches and aquamarine waters, is complemented by the simple houses built on stilts near the shore, from which residents keep a watchful eye on their boats and the sea. Bo Cho Island is a sacred home for the Moken (Sea Gypsy), and a small resettlement zone has been established on the island which has turned into a year-round Moken village of approximately one thousand year-round residents. Visitors going ashore can take in a local culture that is deeply connected to the ocean, where locals employ unique methods for fishing and boat design. On the island there is also a small temple with a statue of the Buddha in view of the bright turquoise sea.
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Gunung Leuser National Park covers more than 3,000 square miles in northern Sumatra, Indonesia, straddling the border of North Sumatra and Aceh provinces. It is named after Mount Leuser (10,230 feet), and includes a wide range of ecosystems. Most of the park is mountainous. It was declared an UNESCO World Heritage site “Tropical Rainforest Heritage of Sumatra”, because of its unique biodiversity, with more than 120 species of mammals, 190 species of reptiles and amphibians, 350 species of birds and 4000 plant species. There are some of the world’s rarest mammals living here, including the Sumatran elephant, Sumatran tiger, Sumatran rhinoceros, sambar deer and leopard cat. On the eastern side of Gunung Leuser National Park, at Bukit Lawang, is an orangutan sanctuary and rehabilitation centre that was set up by a Swiss organization in 1973. The orangutans have been released back into the jungle, but are still monitored by rangers.
Gunung Leuser National Park covers more than 3,000 square miles in northern Sumatra, Indonesia, straddling the border of North Sumatra and Aceh provinces. It is named after Mount Leuser (10,230 feet), and includes a wide range of ecosystems. Most of the park is mountainous. It was declared an UNESCO World Heritage site “Tropical Rainforest Heritage of Sumatra”, because of its unique biodiversity, with more than 120 species of mammals, 190 species of reptiles and amphibians, 350 species of birds and 4000 plant species. There are some of the world’s rarest mammals living here, including the Sumatran elephant, Sumatran tiger, Sumatran rhinoceros, sambar deer and leopard cat. On the eastern side of Gunung Leuser National Park, at Bukit Lawang, is an orangutan sanctuary and rehabilitation centre that was set up by a Swiss organization in 1973. The orangutans have been released back into the jungle, but are still monitored by rangers.
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

The main island of Singapore is shaped like a flattened diamond, 42 km (26 miles) east to west and 23 km (14 miles) north to south. Near the northern peak is the causeway leading to West Malaysia—Kuala Lumpur is less than four hours away by car. It is at the southern foot where you will find most of the city-state’s action, with its gleaming office towers, working docks, and futuristic "supertrees," which are solar-powered and serve as vertical gardens. Offshore are Sentosa and over 60 smaller islands, most uninhabited, that serve as bases for oil refining or as playgrounds and beach escapes from the city. To the east is Changi International Airport, connected to the city by metro, bus, and a tree-lined parkway. Of the island's total land area, more than half is built up, with the balance made up of parkland, farmland, plantations, swamp areas, and rain forest. Well-paved roads connect all parts of the island, and Singapore city has an excellent, and constantly expanding, public transportation system. The heart of Singapore's history and its modern wealth are in and around the Central Business District. The area includes the skyscrapers in the Central Business District, the 19th-century Raffles Hotel, the convention centers of Marina Square, on up to the top of Ft. Canning. Although most of old Singapore has been knocked down to make way for the modern city, most colonial landmarks have been preserved in the CBD, including early-19th-century buildings designed by the Irish architect George Coleman.

Suites & Fares

World Cruise Finder's suites are some of the most spacious in luxury cruising.
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Owner's 1 Bedroom
Owner's 1 Bedroom
FROM US$ 27,800
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Grand 1 Bedroom
Grand 1 Bedroom
FROM US$ 25,300
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Silver
Silver
FROM US$ 22,900
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Medallion
Medallion
FROM US$ 21,800
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Veranda
Veranda
FROM US$ 18,600
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Vista
Vista
FROM US$ 13,800
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View
View
FROM US$ 13,200
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Explorer Class
Explorer Class
FROM US$ 12,400
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Adventurer Class
Adventurer Class
FROM US$ 11,900
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Competitive Silversea rates. Request a quote.

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