Ultra-luxury cruises with private butler service.

Asia

Sydney to Bali - Voyage Number : 7786
DEPARTURE
Feb 19 2022
DURATION
15 DAYS
SHIP
Silver Muse

Itinerary & Excursions

Go beyond your boundaries and explore the world as never before.

Sydney belongs to the exclusive club of cities that generate excitement. At the end of a marathon flight there's renewed vitality in the cabin as the plane circles the city, where thousands of yachts are suspended on the dark water and the sails of the Opera House glisten in the distance. Blessed with dazzling beaches and a sunny climate, Sydney is among the most beautiful cities on the planet.

With 4.6 million people, Sydney is the biggest and most cosmopolitan city in Australia. A wave of immigration from the 1950s has seen the Anglo-Irish immigrants who made up the city's original population joined by Italians, Greeks, Turks, Lebanese, Chinese, Vietnamese, Thais, and Indonesians. This intermingling has created a cultural vibrancy and energy—and a culinary repertoire—that was missing only a generation ago.

Sydneysiders embrace their harbor with a passion. Indented with numerous bays and beaches, Sydney Harbour is the presiding icon for the city, and urban Australia. Captain Arthur Phillip, commander of the 11-ship First Fleet, wrote in his diary when he first set eyes on the harbor on January 26, 1788: "We had the satisfaction of finding the finest harbor in the world."

Although a visit to Sydney is an essential part of an Australian experience, the city is no more representative of Australia than Los Angeles is of the United States. Sydney has joined the ranks of the great cities whose characters are essentially international. What Sydney offers is style, sophistication, and great looks—an exhilarating prelude to the continent at its back door.

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

Consistently rated among the "world's most livable cities" in quality-of-life surveys, Melbourne is built on a coastal plain at the top of the giant horseshoe of Port Phillip Bay. The city center is an orderly grid of streets where the state parliament, banks, multinational corporations, and splendid Victorian buildings that sprang up in the wake of the gold rush now stand. This is Melbourne's heart, which you can explore at a leisurely pace in a couple of days.

In Southbank, one of the newer precincts south of the city center, the Southgate development of bars, restaurants, and shops has refocused Melbourne's vision on the Yarra River. Once a blighted stretch of factories and run-down warehouses, the southern bank of the river is now a vibrant, exciting part of the city, and the river itself is finally taking its rightful place in Melbourne's psyche.

Just a hop away, Federation Square—with its host of galleries—has become a civic landmark for Melburnians. Stroll along the Esplanade in the suburb of St. Kilda, amble past the elegant houses of East Melbourne, enjoy the shops and cafés in Fitzroy or Carlton, rub shoulders with locals at the Victoria Market, nip into the Windsor for afternoon tea, or rent a canoe at Studley Park to paddle along one of the prettiest stretches of the Yarra—and you may discover Melbourne's soul as well as its heart.

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

Australians think of Adelaide as a city of churches, but Adelaide has outgrown its reputation as a sleepy country town dotted with cathedrals and spires. The Adelaide of this millennium is infinitely more complex, with a large, multiethnic population and thriving urban art and music scenes supported by a "space activation program" that encourages pop-up shops, markets, performances, street food, mini festivals, art exhibitions, and other "off-the-cuff" experiences in the cities underutilized streets and public spaces.

Bright and clean, leafy and beautiful Adelaide is a breeze to explore, with a grid pattern of streets encircled by parkland. The heart of the greenbelt is divided by the meandering River Torrens, which passes the Festival Centre in its prettiest stretch.

Port Lincoln is the second-largest city on the lower Eyre Peninsula in the Australian state of South Australia. Nestled on the shore of Boston Bay, Australia's largest natural harbour, Port Lincoln opens eastward into Spencer Gulf. Port Lincoln is the largest city in the west coast region, and located approximately 174 miles (280 kilometres) from the capital city of Adelaide. Port Lincoln has a contrasting coastal landscape, ranging from sheltered waters and beaches to surf beaches and rugged oceanic coastline. The Great South Australian Coastal Upwelling System brings cold, nutrient-rich water into nearby waters of the Great Australian Bight and Spencer Gulf. This phenomenon supports lucrative fisheries, including that of the southern bluefin tuna and sardine, making Port Lincoln locally-renowned as the 'Seafood Capital of Australia'. The Eyre Peninsula has been home to Aboriginal people for thousands of years. The Nauo (south-western Eyre), Barngarla (eastern Eyre), Wirangu (north-western Eyre) and Mirning (far-western Eyre) being the predominant original cultural groups present at the time of the arrival of Europeans. Port Lincoln was discovered by Matthew Flinders under his commission by the British Admiralty to chart Australia's unexplored coastline. Flinders dropped anchor in Boston Bay in February 1802, and named the spot Port Lincoln after his native Lincolnshire in England. Port Lincoln was initially considered as the alternative site for the State's capital, but was subsequently rejected by Colonel Light in 1836 in favour of Adelaide; a lack of fresh water supplies was a major determining factor. The first settlers arrived in Port Lincoln in March 1839 aboard the Abeona, the Dorset and the Porter. There is an historic plaque at the First Landing site to commemorate the event. In the years since, Port Lincoln has evolved into one of the nation's biggest combined agricultural, fishing and aquaculture industries, with tourism becoming a major contributor towards the local economy. Port Lincoln offers ample opportunities to explore its unique blend of cultures and storied past. The local culture, traditions and storied past can be experienced during visits to any of Port Lincoln's scenic and informative museums. The Axel Stenross Museum is filled with maritime history, relics and artefacts from windjammer days. The Koppio Smithy National Trust Museum is a vast, Heritage-listed, open-air museum nestled amidst the rolling hills of Koppio, and replete with buildings and artefacts representing the early pioneer heritage of Eyre Peninsula. The Mt. Dutton Bay Woolshed Museum is a Heritage-listed 'working' museum consisting of hundreds of local artefacts depicting the history of Port Lincoln's historic shearing, farming and fishing era. The National Trust 'Mill Cottage' offers visitors a unique opportunity to explore the pioneering life of the Bishop family, one of Port Lincoln's first settlement families, during a visit to their 1866 home. The Railway Museum provides an authentic setting for many of the museum displays, with many internal features still intact from the days when it was an active railway station. Port Lincoln is home to 148,263 acres (60,000 hectares) of national parks, with abundant beaches, local wildlife, flora and fauna, 250 bird species, and breath-taking panoramic vistas of Boston Bay, Spencer Gulf and beyond. Port Lincoln National Park, Coffin Bay National Park and Kellidie Bay Conservation Park are all located nearby, and represent a unique opportunity to explore Port Lincoln's exquisite natural and coastal beauty. Land-based outdoor excursions include bird-watching, scenic walking tours, off-road 4WD excursions and wildlife tours at the Glen-Forest Tourist Park and Wilderness Wanders Adventure Tours, or a relaxing round of golf at the Port Lincoln Golf Club, located 6.2 miles (10 kilometres) from Port Lincoln. The abundant blue waters off Port Lincoln, Boston Bay, Spencer Gulf and the ocean beyond are ideally-suited for aquaculture tours, windsurfing, surfing, snorkelling, scuba-diving, fishing, boating, sailing, swimming with bluefin tuna at Swim with the Tuna, and shark cage-diving and swimming with sea lions, seals, rays, and grouper at Calypso Star Charters and Rodney Fox Shark Expeditions. Due to its compact size, Port Lincoln can be easily explored in just a single day.
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Proclaimed a city on July 1, 1998, Albany with a population of 28,000 is rapidly expanding. It is the commercial center of Western Australia's southern region and the oldest settlement in the state, established in 1826. Boasting an excellent harbor on King George Sound led to Albany becoming a thriving whaling port. Later, when steam ships started traveling between England and Australia, Albany was an important coaling station and served as a penal and a military outpost. The coastline offers some of Australia's most rugged and spectacular scenery. At certain times of the year, whales can be spotted off the coast. Among the city's attractions are some fine old colonial buildings that reflect Albany's Victorian heritage. Various lookout points offer stunning vistas.

The port city of Fremantle is a jewel in Western Australia's crown, largely because of its colonial architectural heritage and hippy vibe. Freo (as the locals call it) is a city of largely friendly, interesting, and sometimes eccentric residents supportive of busking, street art, and alfresco dining. Like all great port cities, Freo is cosmopolitan, with mariners from all parts of the world strolling the streets—including thousands of U.S. Navy personnel on rest and recreation throughout the year. It's also a good jumping-off point for a day trip to Rottnest Island, where lovely beaches, rocky coves, and unique wallaby-like inhabitants called quokkas set the scene.

Modern Fremantle is a far cry from the barren, sandy plain that greeted the first wave of English settlers back in 1829 at the newly constituted Swan River Colony. Most were city dwellers, and after five months at sea in sailing ships they landed on salt-marsh flats that sorely tested their fortitude. Living in tents with packing cases for chairs, they found no edible crops, and the nearest freshwater was a distant 51 km (32 miles)—and a tortuous trip up the waters of the Swan. As a result they soon moved the settlement upriver to the vicinity of present-day Perth.

Fremantle remained the principal port, and many attractive limestone buildings were built to service the port traders. Australia's 1987 defense of the America's Cup—held in waters off Fremantle—triggered a major restoration of the colonial streetscapes. In the leafy suburbs nearly every other house is a restored 19th-century gem.

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
An island of startling contradictions and contrasts, Lombok exudes an aura of the staid and the rural, a genteel way of life in a quiet backwater. Located to the east and across a deep strait from its illustrious neighbor Bali, the island of Lombok offers unique culture, beautiful landscapes and a far less frenetic, pressured atmosphere than Bali. However, savvy travelers agree that Lombok’s calm existence may soon come to an end, as it is fast becoming the new "in place" after Bali. The island was once ruled by a series of Sasak princes who spent their time fending off successive invasions from Sumbawanese and Makassarese attackers. In 1740, the Balinese established a stronghold here and imposed their culture on the Sasaks. Later, Lombok came under Dutch rule until the country achieved independence. The western part of the almost circular island is well irrigated by mountain streams and artesian springs. Here Balinese and Sasaks have sculpted handsome rice terraces; Hindu temples vie for attention with glistening white mosques rising from picturesque rural villages. More dramatic is the southern coast with beautiful sandy bays set between rocky outcrops. Most of Lombok’s attractions are concentrated in the western district of the island, within a nine-mile radius of the capital, Mataram. Members of Lombok's polyglot population - Sasak, Balinese, Chinese and Arab - continue their laid-back, traditional ways.

Bali really is as alluring as everyone says. This island has it all: beaches, volcanoes, terraced rice fields, forests, renowned resorts, surfing, golf, and world-class dive sites. But what sets Bali apart from other nearby tropical destinations is Balinese tradition, and villagers dedicated to celebrating it. The hundreds of temples, dances, rituals, and crafts linked to their ancient Hindu faith aren't a show for tourists, but a living, breathing culture in which visitors are warmly received by the Balinese, who cherish their own identities.

Suites & Fares

World Cruise Finder's suites are some of the most spacious in luxury cruising.
Request a Quote - guests who book early are rewarded with the best fares and ability to select their desired suite.

Owner's 2 Bedroom
Owner's 2 Bedroom
FROM US$ 27,200
with early booking bonus
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Grand 2 Bedroom
Grand 2 Bedroom
FROM US$ 26,000
with early booking bonus
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Royal 2 Bedroom
Royal 2 Bedroom
FROM US$ 24,500
with early booking bonus
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Owner's 1 Bedroom
Owner's 1 Bedroom
FROM US$ 22,000
with early booking bonus
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Silver 2 Bedroom
Silver 2 Bedroom
FROM US$ 20,900
with early booking bonus
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Grand 1 Bedroom
Grand 1 Bedroom
FROM US$ 19,400
with early booking bonus
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Royal 1 Bedroom
Royal 1 Bedroom
FROM US$ 17,700
with early booking bonus
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Silver
Silver
FROM US$ 15,100
with early booking bonus
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Deluxe Veranda
Deluxe Veranda
FROM US$ 9,900
with early booking bonus
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Superior Veranda
Superior Veranda
FROM US$ 9,500
with early booking bonus
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Classic Veranda
Classic Veranda
FROM US$ 9,100
with early booking bonus
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Panorama
Panorama
FROM US$ 8,300
with early booking bonus
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Vista
Vista
FROM US$ 7,300
with early booking bonus
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Competitive Silversea rates. Request a quote.

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