Ultra-luxury cruises with private butler service.

South America

Guayaquil to Valparaiso - Voyage Number : 7771
DEPARTURE
Nov 07 2022
DURATION
11 DAYS
SHIP
Silver Wind

Itinerary & Excursions

Go beyond your boundaries and explore the world as never before.

The second major jumping off point for the Galapagos Islands after Quito, this is a little city with a big heart. A sea port first and foremost, the city’s personality has been founded on that, and all the better it is for it too. Almost Caribbean in feeling, the clement climate coupled with the intermingling rhythms floating from the windows and abundance of fresh seafood make this a very tropical destination.

Once not even considered by the travel books as a potential destination in its own right, the city has undergone something of a resurgence in the past few years. Proud Guayaquileños will not hestitate to point out the Malecón or the exciting new riverfront promenade, once a no-go area after dark, now happily (and hippily) lined with museums, restaurants, shops, and ongoing entertainment. The new airport and urban transportation network are also lauded to the happy tourists who find themselves here.

As the largest and most populous city in Ecuador as well as being the commercial centre, it would only be natural that the city would have some kind of modern architecture, but it is the colourful favelas, or to use their real name guasmos, that cling to the side of the hillside like limpets that really catch your eye. A blend of old and new, the first inhabitants can be traced back to 1948 when the government cleared the area for affordable housing, these shanty towns are witness to the social and political particularities that Guayaquil has faced in the past.

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Located about nine hours north of Lima, Trujillo was founded in 1534 by the Spanish conquistador Pizarro. The attractive, colonial city retains much of its original charm with elegant casonas, or mansions, lining the streets. Nearby is Chan Chan, the ancient capital of the Chimú, a local Indian tribe who came under the rule of the Incas. The area has several other Chimú sites, some dating back about 1500 years. The region is also famous as the home of the Peruvian Paso horses, as well as excellent beaches offering world-class surfing and other water sports.

When people discuss great South American cities, Lima is often overlooked. But Peru's capital can hold its own against its neighbors. It has an oceanfront setting, colonial-era splendor, sophisticated dining, and nonstop nightlife.

It's true that the city—clogged with traffic and choked with fumes—doesn't make a good first impression, especially since the airport is in an industrial neighborhood. But wander around the regal edifices surrounding the Plaza de Armas, among the gnarled olive trees of San Isidro's Parque El Olivar, or along the winding lanes in the coastal community of Barranco, and you'll find yourself charmed.

In 1535 Francisco Pizarro found the perfect place for the capital of Spain's colonial empire. On a natural port, the so-called Ciudad de los Reyes (City of Kings) allowed Spain to ship home all the gold the conquistador plundered from the Inca. Lima served as the capital of Spain's South American empire for 300 years, and it's safe to say that no other colonial city enjoyed such power and prestige during this period.

When Peru declared its independence from Spain in 1821, the declaration was read in the square that Pizarro had so carefully designed. Many of the colonial-era buildings around the Plaza de Armas are standing today. Walk a few blocks in any direction for churches and elegant houses that reveal just how wealthy this city once was. But the poor state of most buildings attests to the fact that the country's wealthy families have moved to neighborhoods to the south over the past century.

The walls that surrounded the city were demolished in 1870, making way for unprecedented growth. A former hacienda became the graceful residential neighborhood of San Isidro. In the early 1920s the construction of tree-lined Avenida Arequipa heralded the development of neighborhoods such as bustling Miraflores and bohemian Barranco.

Almost a third of the country's population of 29 million lives in the metropolitan area, many of them in relatively poor conos: newer neighborhoods on the outskirts of the city. Most residents of those neighborhoods moved there from mountain villages during the political violence and poverty that marked the 1980s and ’90s, when crime increased dramatically. During the past decade the country has enjoyed peace and steady economic growth, which have been accompanied by many improvements and refurbishment in the city. Residents who used to steer clear of the historic center now stroll along its streets. And many travelers who once would have avoided the city altogether now plan to spend a day here and end up staying two or three.

The port city of Paracas is blessed with magnificent natural beauty and rich historical importance, offerings inviting beaches, ideal weather and pleasant scenery — a combination that draws visitors throughout the year. The shores of the Paracas Peninsula and waters of the bay teem with wildlife and have been declared a national reserve. Condors frequently can be seen gliding on the sea winds or perched on the cliffs; pink flamingos often rest here on their migratory flights. The complex interaction between wind and ocean, sun and land has transformed this region into a kind of lunarscape under an equatorial sun. Another reason for travellers to come to this area is its proximity to the famous and mysterious Nazca Lines. Visible from the air, these strange markings stretch for miles on a large barren plain and have bewildered archaeologists, historians and mathematicians since their discovery over a century ago. The earliest Andean people found shelter here. The Paracas culture was known for fine weavings in geometrical designs and vibrant colours, which have been preserved for thousands of years by the dry climate. Some of the finest examples are in museums in Lima. The town of Ica is Peru’s finest wine centre, as well as home to the fiery brandy-derived beverage known as Pisco. The surrounding area features oases with springs considered to have medicinal cures. Pier Information The ship is scheduled to dock at Port of Paracas, about a 45-minute drive from Ica. There are no passenger facilities at the pier. Shopping Shopping opportunities are limited; some souvenirs can be found at the museum in Ica. A bottle of Peruvian Pisco (grape brandy) makes a nice memento. The local currency is the nuevo sol. Cuisine Seafood is highly recommended, however, we recommend you dine only in the hotel restaurants in Peru’s southern region. Be sure to sample the national drink pisco sour and the area’s excellent wines. Always drink bottled water and avoid ice cubes. Other Sites The Bay of Paracas is sheltered by the Paracas peninsula, noted as one of the best marine reserves in the world. This is also a popular resort area thanks to its beautiful bay, beaches and dependable warm weather. Facilities include swimming pools, tennis courts, miniature golf and a good restaurant. For those who are looking for a little adventure dune buggies are available. Local boat trips can be booked to the Ballestas Islands but be aware that commentary is given in Spanish. Private arrangements for independent sightseeing are limited in this port as cars have to come from Lima. Please submit your request to the Tour Office early in the cruise.
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

Arica boasts that it is "the land of the eternal spring," but its temperate climate and beaches are not the only reason to visit this small city. Relax for an hour or two on the Plaza 21 de Mayo. Walk to the pier and watch the pelicans and sea lions trail the fishing boats as the afternoon's catch comes in. Walk to the top of the Morro and imagine battles of days gone by, or wonder at the magnitude of modern shipping as Chilean goods leave the port below by container ship.

Arica is gaining notice for its great surfing conditions, and in 2009 hosted the Rusty Arica Pro Surf Challenge, a qualifying event to the world series of surf.

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Situated between the ocean and the mountains of the Coastal Range is Chile’s largest city of the northern region. Antofagasta's role as port for the exportation of nitrate began in 1866. In 1872, when silver was discovered, the first municipality was established. Today, Antofagasta is still the centre of nitrate and copper mining, as well as an important hub for rail traffic to La Paz, Bolivia, and Salta, Argentina. According to the treaty signed after the War of the Pacific, much of Bolivia's international commerce transits through Antofagasta. The area surrounding Antofagasta is renowned for having the highest solar intensity in the world. Its archaeological zones, desert and mountains make it a sought after place for travellers looking for unusual destinations. The city's landscaped plazas are a tribute to man's conquest over the desert. Plaza Colón boasts a landmark Westminster clock donated by the British residents; the design of the old Customs House is an odd combination of Spanish colonial and Swiss chalet-style architecture. The soil in the gardens along Avenida O'Higgins was brought from all over the world as ships' ballast, replaced by nitrate for their return voyages. Arriving by sea presents the best view of Antofagasta's unique setting between the ocean, the desert and the mountains – arguably the city's most impressive feature. Please Note: Due to the limited tourism infrastructure in this port, the buses and guides may not be up to Western standards but are the best available in this particular area. Local conditions may be challenging, therefore we urge flexibility and understanding as we visit these unique, and somewhat remote destinations. Pier Information The ship is scheduled to dock at the Port of Antofagasta, located about 2 miles (3 km) from the town centre. Taxis are not allowed inside the port. Shopping The major shopping area for local goods is found along the three-block pedestrian zone. A handicrafts market is located in the Plaza del Mercado, featuring articles made by artists in the High-Plateau area. Most shops open a 9:30 a.m. and close between 1:30 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. The local currency is the peso. Cuisine For good food with an excellent view, beach and swimming pool, the Hotel Antofagasta is worth a try. The Yacht Club is also noted for fine cuisine and a great view of the old harbour. Other Sites In addition to the attractions covered on the organized tour, sports enthusiasts will find a golf course with sand greens. Guests interested should check with the Shore Concierge Office on board well in advance for availability and reservations. Please bear in mind that mostly Spanish speaking visitors frequent this region; English is not widely spoken. Private arrangements for independent sightseeing may be requested through the Shore Concierge Office on board, subject to the availability of English-speaking guides. There are no sedans available, only vans.

The rugged shores of Isla Pan de Azucar (or Sugarloaf Island) are home to thousands of Humboldt Penguins. The penguins come to this arid island to breed and spend their days fishing, swimming and diving, as do many of the other birds found here. The waters around Isla Pan de Azucar also support Kelp Gulls, Blackish Oystercatchers, Peruvian Boobies, pelicans, sea lions and the reclusive South American marine otter.

The name Coquimbo is derived from a native Diaguita word meaning 'place of calm waters'. In fact, Charles Darwin had noted that the town was 'remarkable for nothing but its extreme quietness'. Since then, Coquimbo has developed into a bustling port and the region's major commercial and industrial centre from which minerals, fish products and fruits are exported. Used during the colonial period as a port for La Serena, Coquimbo attracted attention from English pirates, including Sir Francis Drake, who visited in 1578. Visitors enjoy strolling around the town, admiring some of the elaborate woodwork handcrafted on buildings by early British and American settlers. These wooden buildings are among Chile's most interesting historical structures. Out of town, the area offers some fine beaches in a desert-like setting. Coquimbo serves as a gateway to the popular resort town of La Serena and trips farther into the Elqui Valley, known as the production centre for Chile's national drink, pisco sour. The valley is also home to several international observatories that take advantage of the region's exceptional atmospheric conditions.

Valparaíso's dramatic topography—45 cerros, or hills, overlooking the ocean—requires the use of winding pathways and wooden ascensores (funiculars) to get up many of the grades. The slopes are covered by candy-color houses—there are almost no apartments in the city—most of which have exteriors of corrugated metal peeled from shipping containers decades ago. Valparaíso has served as Santiago's port for centuries. Before the Panama Canal opened, Valparaíso was the busiest port in South America. Harsh realities—changing trade routes, industrial decline—have diminished its importance, but it remains Chile's principal port. Most shops, banks, restaurants, bars, and other businesses cluster along the handful of streets called El Plan (the flat area) that are closest to the shoreline. Porteños (which means "the residents of the port") live in the surrounding hills in an undulating array of colorful abodes. At the top of any of the dozens of stairways, the paseos (promenades) have spectacular views; many are named after prominent Yugoslavian, Basque, and German immigrants. Neighborhoods are named for the hills they cover. With the jumble of power lines overhead and the hundreds of buses that slow down—but never completely stop—to pick up agile riders, it's hard to forget you're in a city. Still, walking is the best way to experience Valparaíso.

Suites & Fares

World Cruise Finder's suites are some of the most spacious in luxury cruising.
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Owner's 2 Bedroom
Owner's 2 Bedroom
FROM US$ 25,800
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Grand 2 Bedroom
Grand 2 Bedroom
FROM US$ 23,500
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Owner's 1 Bedroom
Owner's 1 Bedroom
FROM US$ 22,800
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Royal 2 Bedroom
Royal 2 Bedroom
FROM US$ 21,200
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Grand 1 Bedroom
Grand 1 Bedroom
FROM US$ 19,100
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Royal 1 Bedroom
Royal 1 Bedroom
FROM US$ 16,700
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Silver
Silver
FROM US$ 14,400
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Medallion
Medallion
FROM US$ 13,000
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Deluxe Veranda
Deluxe Veranda
FROM US$ 9,700
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Classic Veranda
Classic Veranda
FROM US$ 8,500
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Vista
Vista
FROM US$ 7,300
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Competitive Silversea rates. Request a quote.

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