Ultra-luxury cruises with private butler service.

Mediterranean

Lisbon to Civitavecchia - Voyage Number : 7300
DEPARTURE
Nov 05 2021
DURATION
10 DAYS
SHIP
Silver Shadow

Itinerary & Excursions

Go beyond your boundaries and explore the world as never before.

Spread over a string of seven hills north of the Rio Tejo (Tagus River) estuary, Lisbon presents an intriguing variety of faces to those who negotiate its switchback streets. In the oldest neighborhoods, stepped alleys whose street pattern dates back to Moorish times are lined with pastel-color houses decked with laundry; here and there, miradouros (vantage points) afford spectacular river or city views. In the grand 18th-century center, calçada à portuguesa (black-and-white mosaic cobblestone) sidewalks border wide boulevards. Elétricos (trams) clank through the streets, and blue-and-white azulejos (painted and glazed ceramic tiles) adorn churches, restaurants, and fountains.

Of course, parts of Lisbon lack charm. Even some downtown areas have lost their classic Portuguese appearance as the city has become more cosmopolitan: shiny office blocks have replaced some 19th- and 20th-century art nouveau buildings. And centenarian trams share the streets with "fast trams" and noisy automobiles.

Lisbon bears the mark of an incredible heritage with laid-back pride. In preparing to host the 1998 World Exposition, Lisbon spruced up public buildings, overhauled its subway system, and completed an impressive second bridge across the river. Today the former Expo site is an expansive riverfront development known as Parque das Nações, and the city is a popular port of call for cruises, whose passengers disembark onto a revitalized waterfront. Downtown, all the main squares have been overhauled one by one.

In its heyday in the 16th century, Lisbon was a pioneer of the first wave of globalization. Now, the empire is striking back, with Brazilians and people from the former Portuguese colonies in Africa enriching the city’s ethnic mix. There are also more than a few people from other European countries who are rapidly becoming integrated.

But Lisbon's intrinsic, slightly disorganized, one-of-a-kind charm hasn't vanished in the contemporary mix. Lisboetas (people from Lisbon) are at ease pulling up café chairs and perusing newspapers against any backdrop, whether it reflects the progress and commerce of today or the riches that once poured in from Asia, South America, and Africa. And quiet courtyards and sweeping viewpoints are never far away.

Despite rising prosperity (and costs) since Portugal entered the European Community in 1986, and the more recent tourism boom, prices for most goods and services are still lower than most other European countries. You can still find affordable places to eat and stay, and with distances between major sights fairly small, taxis are astonishingly cheap. All this means that Lisbon is not only a treasure chest of historical monuments, but also a place where you won’t use up all your own hard-earned treasure.

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Whether you pronounce it Seville or Sevilla, this gorgeous Spanish town is most certainly the stuff of dreams. Over 2,200 years old, Seville has a mutli-layered personality; home to Flamenco, high temperatures and three UNESCO-World Heritage Sites, there is a noble ancestry to the southern Spanish town. Not forgetting that it is the birthplace of painter Diego Velazquez, the resting place of Christopher Columbus, the inspiration for Bizet’s Carmen and a location for Game of Thrones filming, Seville is truly more than just a sum of its parts. This city is a full on experience, a beguiling labyrinth of centuries old streets, tiny tapas restaurants serving possibly the best dishes you’ll taste south of Madrid and a paradise of Mudejar architecture and tranquil palm trees and fountain-filled gardens.
Whether you pronounce it Seville or Sevilla, this gorgeous Spanish town is most certainly the stuff of dreams. Over 2,200 years old, Seville has a mutli-layered personality; home to Flamenco, high temperatures and three UNESCO-World Heritage Sites, there is a noble ancestry to the southern Spanish town. Not forgetting that it is the birthplace of painter Diego Velazquez, the resting place of Christopher Columbus, the inspiration for Bizet’s Carmen and a location for Game of Thrones filming, Seville is truly more than just a sum of its parts. This city is a full on experience, a beguiling labyrinth of centuries old streets, tiny tapas restaurants serving possibly the best dishes you’ll taste south of Madrid and a paradise of Mudejar architecture and tranquil palm trees and fountain-filled gardens.
Many first-time visitors may find the Tangier port such a rude awakening that they fail to see the beauty of the place. Mobs of bona fide hustlers greet the arriving ferries hungry for fresh greenhorns to fleece in any way they can. Simply walk quickly past these unsolicited assistants, pretend you know exactly where you're going, and show no sign that you're bewildered. Once you hit your stride and start going places with confidence, Tangier has a charm that this raucous undercurrent only enhances: crumbling Kasbah walls, intimate corners in the serpentine medina, piles of bougainvillea, French balconies, Spanish cafés, and other remnants of times gone by. Tangier is a melting pot—a place where it's not uncommon to see sophisticated Moroccans sharing sidewalks with rural Rifi Berbers. Travelers from around the world all converge on the African continent's nearest point eager for a look into a cultural potpourri that has taken thousands of years to blend.
Set in the province of Grenada and nestled halfway between Malaga and Almeria lies the pretty coastal town of Motril. With its whitewashed houses and sandy beaches, particularly those to the west of the town at Salobreña, you could be mistaken for thinking that it is just another seaside resort. However, the town is built on a steep hill and there are fantastic views from the top – with plenty of authentic Tapas bars to stop off at on the way. A magnificent distant backdrop of snow the covered Sierra Nevada Mountains – even in high summer – makes the journey all the more worthwhile. To the west of Motril lies Almuñecar famous for its Bird Park, state of the art Aquarium and an excellent weekly market every Thursday. Easy access to the alluring city of Grenada makes for interesting day trips.
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Tunisia's capital lies at the western end of the shallow Lake Tunis, which opens to the sea at La Goulette. This is the first of a string of beach suburbs that stretches away to the north; it is here that the city's port is located. This coastal area includes the ruins of ancient Carthage and the picturesque suburb of Sidi Bou Said, places that attract more visitors than Tunis itself. As far as capital cities go, Tunis has an easy-going, unhurried air about it. It is a very liberal city by Islamic standards and certainly leading the way in Western trends for the rest of the country. In Tunisia, the struggle for independence didn't take the violent course that it did in Algeria. Ruler Ahmed Bey, who governed from 1837 to 1855, encouraged Westernization and brought in military and other advisors to this end. In 1861, during the reign of Mohammed Sadiq, a constitution - the first in the Arab world - was proclaimed. Until the time of the French protectorate, the medina was very much the center of things. Then, under the French influence, the ville nouvelle (new city) emerged with its major banks, department stores, and administrative services. The main focus of ville nouvelle is the wide, tree-lined Avenue Habib Bourguiba. At its western end, this major thoroughfare becomes the Avenue de France, terminating in the Place de la Victoire and the entrance to the medina.
Once the intellectual capital of southern Europe, Palermo has always been at the crossroads of civilization. Favorably situated on a crescent-shaped bay at the foot of Monte Pellegrino, it has attracted almost every culture touching the Mediterranean world. To Palermo's credit, it has absorbed these diverse cultures into a unique personality that is at once Arab and Christian, Byzantine and Roman, Norman and Italian. The city's heritage encompasses all of Sicily's varied ages, but its distinctive aspect is its Arab-Norman identity, an improbable marriage that, mixed in with Byzantine and Jewish elements, created some resplendent works of art. No less noteworthy than the architecture is Palermo's chaotic vitality, on display at some of Italy's most vibrant outdoor markets, public squares, street bazaars, and food vendors, and above all in its grand climax of Italy's most spectacular passeggiata (the leisurely social stroll along the principal thoroughfare).
Naples, in the Campania region, is Italy's third largest city. Its claim to fame is the spectacular location along one of the world's most splendid bays, backed by the perfect cone of Mount Vesuvius. In addition to its beautiful setting, Naples' surprises with other outstanding attractions such as the Royal Palace, San Carlos Opera House, the impressive National Archaeological Museum and the Castel Nuovo, dating from the 13th-century. The city's central area is best explored on foot. Chaotic traffic conditions make driving around the city a very frustrating experience. Naples provides a convenient starting point for trips to such favored destinations as Pompeii, Herculaneum and Mount Vesuvius. The Isle of Capri can be reached via a 45-minute hydrofoil service. The region of Campania was home to Greeks settlers some 300 years before Rome was founded. Pompeii, too, was a Greek town before being conquered by the Romans during the 5th century BC. It was under the Romans that Pompeii flourished and grew prosperous. When Mount Vesuvius erupted in 79 AD, the population of 20,000 was wiped out, but dozens of buildings were preserved under layers of cinder more than 20 feet deep. The most important finds from Pompeii are displayed in Naples' National Archaeological Museum. A visit here will no doubt enhance a visit to ancient Pompeii.

Italy's vibrant capital lives in the present, but no other city on earth evokes its past so powerfully. For over 2,500 years, emperors, popes, artists, and common citizens have left their mark here. Archaeological remains from ancient Rome, art-stuffed churches, and the treasures of Vatican City vie for your attention, but Rome is also a wonderful place to practice the Italian-perfected il dolce far niente, the sweet art of idleness. Your most memorable experiences may include sitting at a caffè in the Campo de' Fiori or strolling in a beguiling piazza.

Suites & Fares

World Cruise Finder's suites are some of the most spacious in luxury cruising.
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Owner's 2 Bedroom
Owner's 2 Bedroom
FROM US$ 20,300
with early booking bonus
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Owner's 2 Bedroom
Owner's 2 Bedroom
FROM US$ 20,300
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Grand 2 Bedroom
Grand 2 Bedroom
FROM US$ 20,000
with early booking bonus
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Grand 2 Bedroom
Grand 2 Bedroom
FROM US$ 20,000
with early booking bonus
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Royal 2 Bedroom
Royal 2 Bedroom
FROM US$ 19,500
with early booking bonus
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Royal 2 Bedroom
Royal 2 Bedroom
FROM US$ 19,500
with early booking bonus
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Owner's 1 Bedroom
Owner's 1 Bedroom
FROM US$ 16,700
with early booking bonus
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Owner's 1 Bedroom
Owner's 1 Bedroom
FROM US$ 16,700
with early booking bonus
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Grand 1 Bedroom
Grand 1 Bedroom
FROM US$ 14,600
with early booking bonus
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Grand 1 Bedroom
Grand 1 Bedroom
FROM US$ 14,600
with early booking bonus
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Royal 1 Bedroom
Royal 1 Bedroom
FROM US$ 14,100
with early booking bonus
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Royal 1 Bedroom
Royal 1 Bedroom
FROM US$ 14,100
with early booking bonus
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Silver
Silver
FROM US$ 12,500
with early booking bonus
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Silver
Silver
FROM US$ 12,500
with early booking bonus
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Medallion
Medallion
FROM US$ 11,300
with early booking bonus
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Medallion
Medallion
FROM US$ 11,300
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Deluxe Veranda
Deluxe Veranda
FROM US$ 7,900
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Deluxe Veranda
Deluxe Veranda
FROM US$ 7,900
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Superior Veranda
Superior Veranda
FROM US$ 7,600
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Superior Veranda
Superior Veranda
FROM US$ 7,600
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Classic Veranda
Classic Veranda
FROM US$ 7,300
with early booking bonus
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Classic Veranda
Classic Veranda
FROM US$ 7,300
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Vista
Vista
FROM US$ 6,000
with early booking bonus
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Vista
Vista
FROM US$ 6,000
with early booking bonus
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Competitive Silversea rates. Request a quote.

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